Flushing in ASP.NET MVC

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I’ve written a follow up to this post that answers many of the common questions about flushing early. Be sure to check it out.

The Setting

Before the beginning of this decade, Steve Souders released two seminal books on the topic of web performance: High Performance Web Sitesand Even Faster Web Sites. The findings and subsequent suggestions that came out of those books changed the face of web development and have been codified into several performance analysis tools including Yahoo YSlow and Google PageSpeed.

High Performance Web SitesEven Faster Web Sites

Most professional web developers that I’ve met over the past five years are familiar with Souder’s recommendations and how to implement them in ASP.NET MVC. To be fair, they aren’t that difficult:

  • HTTP Caching and Content Compression can both be enabled simply via a few settings in web.config.
  • Layout pages make it easy to put stylesheets at the top of a…

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The Core Incompetencies of the Corporation

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The internet of everything: 5 big ideas at Structure Connect about connecting everyone and everything


Between the smart home, wearables and the industrial internet, we’re hearing about the internet of things all the time. But before we start connecting devices, we need to connect people in more places, improve connectivity in our homes and offices and even figure out how we can connect our web services to these new products that you control via an app.

It’s a lot to take in. That’s why we’re excited to host Structure Connect, a conference dedicated to the challenges and opportunities that ubiquitous connectivity in everything from sensors to smoke detectors is creating. The conference will take place in San Francisco on Oct. 21 and 22 at the Mission Bay Conference Center. We’ll use the event to discuss how we turn the theoretical promises of energy savings, smarter cities, automated homes that anticipate your needs and more-efficient businesses into reality. You’ll want to be there, so register…

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Does Corporate America Finally Get What Working Parents Need?

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Got Chrome for Windows? Your extensions have to come through Google’s Chrome Web Store


Google announced in November that it was going to start cracking down on Chrome extensions, particularly on the Windows(s msft) platform. The warning became reality this past week as Google is now enforcing the policy it laid out last year. If you run Chrome(s goog) for Windows — either the Beta or Stable channel — all of your browser extensions will be had through the Chrome Web Store. Chrome Canary and the developer channel of Chrome on Windows are exempt from this; these channels can still install Chrome extensions from any source.

Why the new policy? There have been too many reports of malware-infested extensions for Google to ignore. Some extensions were doing things behind the scenes and unknown to users, such as, according to Google, “silently installing extensions on your machine that do things like inject ads or track your browsing activity.” And that’s a no-no. So…

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Google is harnessing machine learning to cut data center energy


Leave it to Google (s GOOG) to have an engineer so brainy he hacks out machine learning models in his 20 percent time. Google says that recently it’s been using machine learning — developed by data center engineer Jim Gao (his Googler nickname is “Boy Genius”) — to predict the energy efficiency of their global data centers down to 99.6 percent accuracy, and then to optimize the data centers in incremental ways if they become less efficient for whatever reason.

Part of Gao’s day-to-day job at Google is to track its data centers’ power usage efficiency, or PUE, which demonstrates how efficiently data center computing equipment is using energy. Traditionally many data center operators were seeing about half of their energy consumed by cooling equipment, but in recent years data center leaders like Google, Facebook(s fb) and others have focused on tools like using the outside air for cooling, or running the server…

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4 mistakes engineers make when building a SaaS company


Before I joined Loggly as CTO and VP of Engineering, I built seven cloud-based products. From my perspective, four mistakes separated the SaaS companies that stumble from the best.

1. “Adoption for our offering will take time, so we can build fast now and build right later.”
Look at how steep the technology adoption curve has become. Every SaaS product needs to be built for scalability and robustness from the start.


Image courtesy Udayan Banerjee

2. “Our customers have predictable behavior.”
Be ready for something unexpected that will threaten to break your service, and have processes for managing out-of-policy activities. For example, Loggly must deal with customers that send a huge burst of log events, inadvertently or during a fire, 24-7.

3. “We don’t need operations automation.”
Operations is at the heart of every SaaS business, and they shouldn’t be treated like sysadmins. By automating defrag of ElasticSearch, Loggly devops saves about 15…

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